Étiqueté : articles

Reflecting on the Saffron Revolution, In Poetry and Prose

Reflecting on the Saffron Revolution, in Poetry and Prose by Courtney Wittekind, 20/09/2017 This week’s posts on Tea Circle represent the start of our forum on the “Saffron Revolution,” during which we will feature submissions by those analyzing, debating, and reflecting upon the impact of Myanmar’s 2007 demonstrations, 10 years on. We will continue to accept submissions through the start of the forum, so if you would like to add your voice, whether in your own post or in the form of a response to … Continuer la lecture de Reflecting on the Saffron Revolution, In Poetry and Prose

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand?

Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand? by Michael Vatikiotis, 14/09/2017, The Economist Rodrigo Duterte bears many similarities to Thaksin Shinawatra WHEN Filipinos attempt to explain the political success of their tough-guy president, Rodrigo Duterte, they tend to point to local precursors. Joseph Estrada, a former matinée idol who had often played Robin Hood types, rose to the presidency by promising to be hard on bad guys and good to the poor. And then there is Ferdinand Marcos, who cultivated an … Continuer la lecture de Will democracy in the Philippines go the way of Thailand?

Rohingya identity and the limits to history

Rohingya identity and the limits to history by Jonathan Saha, 17/09/2017, New Mandala Public discussions around Rohingya people currently fleeing violence in Rakhine state, Myanmar, have often involved arguments about history. While critical historical analysis is useful in offering insights into conflicts, History—if treated as a single, knowable past—is not. This is especially true when dealing with ethnicity. Whatever the past was, no amount of historical research can justify the current violence against Rohingya people. The debate around Rohingya ethnicity lacks awareness of wider … Continuer la lecture de Rohingya identity and the limits to history

Alexandra de Mersan  » Retour en Arakan ou comment comprendre la lente exclusion des Rohingyas « 

    Le 25 août dernier, des membres d’une organisation armée dénommée l’Armée de libération des Rohingyas de l’Arakan (ARSA) ont mené une série d’attaques contre des postes de police dans l’État d’Arakan (ou Rakhine), à l’ouest de la Birmanie, afin de « défendre et de protéger la communauté musulmane d’Arakan ». En octobre 2016, ce groupe avait déjà attaqué trois postes frontière dans la région. La réponse de l’armée birmane et les affrontements qui ont suivi ont provoqué en l’espace de deux semaines, un nouvel exode … Continuer la lecture de Alexandra de Mersan  » Retour en Arakan ou comment comprendre la lente exclusion des Rohingyas « 

intervention d’Alexandra de Mersan sur RFI – samedi 16 sept. 20h10 Géopolitique, le débat Podcast La transition démocratique et la stabilité de la Birmanie sont-elles menacées?

  Le cap des 350.000 musulmans Rohingyas réfugiés au Bangladesh pour fuir les violences a été franchi. L’ONU évoque ce qui semble être un exemple classique de nettoyage ethnique. Que veut l’armée birmane ? Aung Saan Suu Kyi à la tête de l’Etat birman est-elle impuissante ou indifférente ? Invités : – Sophie Boisseau du Rocher, chercheure associée au Centre Asie de l’IFRI. – Alexandra de Mersan, enseignante chercheure à l’INALCO. Rattachée du Centre Asie du Sud-Est au CNRS. Détachée à l’IRASEC, l’Institut de Recherche sur … Continuer la lecture de intervention d’Alexandra de Mersan sur RFI – samedi 16 sept. 20h10 Géopolitique, le débat Podcast La transition démocratique et la stabilité de la Birmanie sont-elles menacées?

Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s

« Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s » by Yufeng Chang in The Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 73, n° 3, August 2017 This article examines the strategy of literary spatialization employed by colonial subjects to imaginatively engage with colonial civilizing projects. It analyzes twelve adventure stories written between the 1910s and 1920s by colonial Vietnamese reformed scholars, whose lives were impacted by the pan-Asian reform movements that swept Japan, China, and Vietnam … Continuer la lecture de Spatializing Enlightened Civilization in the Era of Translating Vernacular Modernity: Colonial Vietnamese Intellectuals’ Adventure Tales and Travelogues, 1910s–1920s

Putting Myanmar’s “Buddhist Extremism” in an International Context

Putting Myanmar’s “Buddhist Extremism” in an International Context by Aye Thein, 01/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford) Aye Thein argues that the international influences on “Buddhist extremism” have been overlooked. This article further develops an idea I had briefly discussed in an earlier piece written for New Mandala in February 2017. A recent phenomenon in Myanmar, which has been called by different names by commentators depending on their preference, has put the country in the international spotlight. It has been characterised, among others terms, as “Buddhist nationalist”, … Continuer la lecture de Putting Myanmar’s “Buddhist Extremism” in an International Context

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines

The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines by Nico Ravanilla, Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia (Issue 22), Young Academics Voice, September 2017 … And How We Might Think About Reforms that Could Undermine Their Entrenchment. Elections in the Philippines are a family affair. Family dynasties control the political landscape, fielding candidates at all levels of government. The current makeup of the Philippine Senate is illustrative: a third of current Filipino Senators are either related to one of the last six Presidents or to former … Continuer la lecture de The Staying Power of Dynastic Politicians in the Philippines

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part II)

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part II) by Matthew J. Walton, 07/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford) One of the holy grails of democratic studies is the idea of transformative citizenship. Many have theorized about how democracy could be transformative or how engaged citizenship could transform relationships between citizens and government, but it is difficult to really track this concept. A national political dialogue process made up of biannual 21st Century Panglong Conferences, themselves consisting of 700 elite representatives mostly drawn from a few centrally … Continuer la lecture de Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part II)

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part I)

Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (part I) by Matthew J. Walton, 06/09/2017, Tea Circle (Oxford) Citizenship is undoubtedly one of the more contentious issues in Myanmar today. But with so much focus on the boundaries of national inclusion, discussions usually ignore a key aspect of citizenship: its practice. The following two posts are excerpted from a chapter that will appear in an upcoming volume, Citizenship in Myanmar: ways of being in and from Burma, edited by Ashley South and Marie Lall (ISEAS … Continuer la lecture de Political Communication and Transformative Citizenship in Myanmar (Part I)

Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago

« Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago » by Melissa Chadburn, 01/09/2017, The New York Times To enter the world of “The Woman Who Had Two Navels and Tales of the Tropical Gothic,” your faith must bend to the following: Time travel exists. Shapeshifting is possible. And a woman could be in power. Nick Joaquin is considered one of the Philippines’ greatest writers. By introducing him here, the publisher Elda Rotor continues her careful curation of Filipino classics for Penguin’s roster. With … Continuer la lecture de Feminist Fiction From the Philippines, Written 50 Years Ago

Décès de Yoshio Abé

Ethnologue, spécialiste reconnu de la riziculture dans le monde, Yoshio Abe est décédé le 21 juillet 2017 à Paris. Il était membre associé au CECMC.